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Teaching dance in the 21st century - Course for professionalization of dance teachers in the HBO

Teaching dance in the 21st century
A course for the professionalization of dance teachers in the HBO



“To understand what I am saying, you have to believe that dance is something other than technique. We forget where the movements come from. They are born from life. When you create a new work, the point of departure must be contemporary life -- not existing forms of dance.” Pina Bausch

“Dancing on the edge is the only place to be.”
Trisha Brown

The Academy of Theatre and Dance of the Amsterdam University of the Arts (AHK) Is organizing a professionalization course for dance teachers. Using the techniques of inter-vision, peer-coaching and reflection the course will examine the role of the dance teacher in higher education. The participants will apply these didactic instruments to the development of their own teaching practice in order to stimulate an active learning community among both colleagues and students. This process will be supported by the introduction of associated concepts of education and learning.

A wide range of questions may be addressed:
•    How did your way of teaching develop and what is its theoretical basis? What was the professional work field like of which you were a part, and how does it compare to the present work field. Which role and responsibility did you hold therein?
•    Which learning and pedagogical concepts do you use within your teaching practice? How aware are you of the choices that you make, and are these the best choices for the development of dance students with regards to their future role in the dance work field?
•    What are the working methods used in the work field, and what are the responsibilities of the dancer of today in the co-creative process? How can you translate these responsibilities (competencies) into an education that fits well to the work field and what is expected of young dancers and dance artists?
•    What does that mean for the role of the dance teacher? Is a dance teacher still an artist? What is dance artistry?

The course includes five meetings, within which assignments and new understanding can be given place and integrated into each individual’s unique teaching practice. This renewed teaching practice will then form the basis for inter-vision and further development of that practice. The sessions will be led by Joyce Brouwer, senior lecturer at the Vrije Universiteit, Amsterdam.

The course meetings will be held from 14.00-17.00 at
The Academy of Theatre and Dance, AHK, Jodenbreestraat 3, Amsterdam on:

Monday, 2 October 2017
Monday, 13 November 2017
Monday, 11 December 2017
Monday, 15 January 2018
Monday, 5 February 2018


A certificate will be issued by a successful participation in at least 4 course meetings and the completion of all assignments. Research is now taking place to determine how this course will contribute to the achievement of the nationally recognized basic qualification in didactic competence for teachers in higher education (the BDB).

This course is also a part of the design research of John Taylor and Angela Linssen, with the support of the Lectoraat Kunsteducatie (Research group in Arts Education) at the AHK.

An overview of academic load and content of the course:
Academic load: 35 hours (of which 15 contact hours)
5 course meetings, focusing upon discipline of dance teaching

Content:

  • Intervision and
  • Reflection over:
    - Own teaching practice
    - Connection to the work field
    - A teacher’s role as artist
    - Creating a learning community
  • Introduction to concepts related to teaching and learning
  • Assignments and creating a portfolio

This course is free of cost to teachers of the Academy of Theatre and Dance
The cost to other teachers is € 500
For further information and to apply for participation:
Ellen van Haeringen: ellen.vanhaeringen[EMAIL BESCHERMD]@[EMAIL BESCHERMD]ahk.nl/ T 020 527 7667/7837

Application is possible until the 20th of September, 2017








photo Nellie de Boer

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